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Travel Pictures - ARGENTINA - 1995

All images Ron Miller

     My first foray into Argentina was a brief crossing near Santiago where I trekked to the foot of Aconcagua - the roof of America. I re-entered Argentina from southern Chile and traveled across Patagonia to the world's southernmost city, Ushuaia, on the island of Tierra del Fuego. Most of my travel across this remote corner of the planet was by the thumb, and I met many amiable and generous Argentineans. However, I also encountered a rather depraved individual and wisely turned down a lift. My final stop in the country was at the most European city outside of Europe - and possibly including Europe - Buenos Aires.

A wonderful couple from Mendoza who gave me a lift and a tour of their favorite retreat in the Andes -
near Mendoza, Argentina

I am not the only visitor seeking a prized photo of Aconcagua -
near Puenta del Inca, Argentina

These two Brazilian businessmen of Japanese descent gave me a lift from the Chilean lowlands to the roof of America.
At times our vehicle exceeded 100 m.p.h.! The roads were good, but not that good -
near Puenta del Inca, Argentina

Close-up view of the 22,481 foot summit of Aconcagua from the base camp at about 13,000 feet - high enough for me!
Although the climb is not technically difficult, many climbers die due to the extreme weather and altitude -
Aconcagua Base Camp, Argentina

Reflecting upon the world's southernmost city on the southern end of Tierra del Fuego -
Ushuaia, Argentina

Pole marking the southern terminus of the Pan American Highway - 11,000 miles from Alaska! -
near Ushuaia, Argentina
My propeller plane is arriving (at center) to fly me northward to the mainland -
Ushuaia, Argentina
One of the 47 species of dolphins, the Commerson's dolphin has a distinct black and white pattern (a slight difference between
the sexes). The Commerson's dolphin actually resembles the smaller porpoise although it's behavior is more in line with dolphins.
Dolphins and porpoises are closely related and are classified into different families (delphinidae and phocoenidae) within the
same scientific suborder, odontoceti, that includes all toothed whales. Dolphins can be distinguished from porpoises by their teeth.
In addition, the porpoise has a smaller, rounded head and a blunt jaw rather than a beak or snout.
Flipper was a dolphin and so are killer whales! -
near San Julian, Argentina
Magellanic penguins nesting on their "private" island just off the Atlantic coast -
near San Julian, Argentina
Perhaps the world's most European city -
Buenos Aires, Argentina
My wonderful friend and guide, Andrea, posing in the city center -
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Popular in Argentina and surrounding countries is the tea-like drink called mate
that is usually slurped from an illegal-looking device -
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Hey, Mr. Cesar Milan, who is the real dog whisperer? -
Buenos Aires, Argentina
The stunning beauty of what many believe to be the world's most attractive waterfall -
Iguazu Falls, Argentina & Brazil
A fantastic waterfall to explore -
Iguazu Falls, Argentina & Brazil
A close-up of the cataract's double drop -
Iguazu Falls, Argentina & Brazil
This waterfall can be viewed from the bottom, side, and top - even from a catwalk on the very brink of the falls -
Iguazu Falls, Argentina & Brazil
This natural gem is a bit like Niagara Falls in the midst of a jungle -
Iguazu Falls, Argentina & Brazil
The Coati (koh-AH-tee) is a member of the raccoon family and is native to South America,
 Central America as well as southwestern North America. Unlike the raccoon, the Coati is diurnal -
Iguazu Falls, Argentina & Brazil
Peering into the "Devil's Throat," which is the most intense section of the falls -
Iguazu Falls, Argentina & Brazil
Viewing the falls from the Brazilian side at sunset -
Iguazu Falls, Argentina & Brazil

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All images Ron Miller
For authorized use of these photos, please contact Ron Miller at TheHappyCannibal@gmail.com